Posts Tagged ‘Matt Holliday’

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In recent years, the left field position has been a blend of what makes the other two spots across the outfield significant. It is home a variety of legit corner outfield power threats, but also features a stash of defensively significant, speed based threats as well.

This year is no different, as the position is home to a grouping of diversely talent players capable of changing the game at any part of it. There are standard bearers who change the game defensively first, to an extent that is shockingly impactful from the spot. There is also a blend of true power conduits, who’s first and foremost goal is to punish the seats beyond the wall. There are also extents of true Five-Tool players, who do a little bit –as well as a lot— of everything across all nine innings.

This all adds up to say there are a lot of ways to make it among the elite at a position that calls upon so many different types of players to make their mark for their respective clubs. But it is also a spot that calls for much from its top-tier producers to stand out amongst each other. So with that, let’s have a look at the best of the best at the very diverse position.

To see last year’s rankings of the position, click here.

 

10. Kyle Schwarber, Cubs (Not Ranked in 2015)

2015: .246/.355/.487, 16 HR, 43 RBI, 6 doubles, 52 runs scored, 3 stolen bases, .842 OPS

He made as big of a late season impact as any rookie in the game. After his late season promotion to Chicago, Schwarber made a habit of launching tape measure shots, launching 13 bombs over the final two months of the season. While he did have some adjustment difficulties once the league got a look at him, hitting .143 versus lefties and .214 over the final two months, his ability to change the game instantly was invaluable.

He played his best ball in the postseason, as he hit .333 and connected for 5 home runs, becoming the Cubs’ all-time postseason leader in the process (dwell on that). And as the currently converted catcher continues to get comfortable in left field, he should embark on the currently carved course of becoming one of the most feared power threats in the National League.

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9. Matt Holliday, Cardinals (#7 in ’15)

2015: .279/.394/.410, 4 HR, 35 RBI, 16 doubles, 24 runs scored, 2 stolen bases, .804 OPS

Last 3 Years: .284/.382/.455 15 HR, 73 RBI, 28 doubles, 70 runs scored, 4 stolen bases, .837 OPS

Injuries severely limited Holliday a year ago, as he twice was sent to the disabled list with a quadriceps that limited him to 73 games. And even before the injury hit, his power numbers were drastically down and stayed low on the other side of his late season return, as hit connected for a career-low four home runs at

What did remain elite for Holliday was his on-base percentage however. He had a very strong first half in that regard before his first injury took him out. He posted a .394 mark on the year, which was fueled by his National League-record setting 45 game streak. If Holliday can re-emerge with a strengthened lower body again, he could remain a solid lower middle of the order presence, even if his elite power days are permanently behind him.

 

8. Christian Yelich, Marlins (#10 in ’15)

2015: .300/.366/.416, 7 HR, 44 RBI, 30 doubles, 63 runs scored, 16 stolen bases, .782 OPS

Last 3 Years: .290/.365/.406 7 HR, 38 RBI, 24 doubles, 64 runs scored, 16 stolen bases, .771 OPS

He overcame a very slow start to 2015 to post improvements across the board for a third consecutive year. This included career best in batting average and on-base percentage, while keeping his extra base hit, stolen base and runs scored levels consistent. He is rounding into becoming one of the more talented top of the lineup hitters in the National League, while continuing to play one of the best defensive left fields in the game.

A player that is entering his age-24 season and has continued to increase his power ratios, while not sacrificing his speed and continuing to increase his contact rate and batting average is a dangerously complete player. He matched his Wins Above Replacement level from his strong 2014 in 18 fewer games a year ago.

 

7. David Peralta, Diamondbacks (Not ranked in ’15)

2015: .312/.371/.522, 17 HR, 78 RBI, 26 doubles, 61 runs scored, 9 stolen bases, .893 OPS

Last 2 Years: .301/.351/.492, 12 HR, 57 RBI, 50 runs scored, 8 stolen bases, .842 OPS

Peralta made an understated impact at the core of the Diamondback lineup and played a major part in why they became one of the biggest sleeper successes in baseball a year ago. Peralta took full advantage of his first opportunity as a full-time starter, totaling 53 extra base hits, good enough to finish in the NL top 10 for slugging percentage and on-base + slugging. Add in the fact that he also led the circuit in triples as well, and the sudden intrigue that is Peralta is complete—almost.

Peralta’s late emergence as a hitter is due to the fact that he spent most of his early career as pitcher before converting to an everyday outfielder. With A.J. Pollock and Paul Goldschmidt hitting ahead of him, Peralta should continue to be fed plenty of at-bats with ducks on the pond to knock in.

 

6. Ryan Braun, Brewers (#7 in right field in ’15)

2015: .285/.356/.498 25 HR, 84 RBI, 27 doubles, 87 runs scored, 24 stolen bases, .854 OPS

Last 3 Years: .279/.346/.479 18 HR, 68 RBI, 24 doubles, 62 runs scored, 13 stolen bases, .825 OPS

Braun will be returning to the position where he originally rose to prominence in 2016, and will also be doing so on the heels of a renaissance year of sorts. Braun’s production had noticeably dipped post-PED suspension and was also fueled by a string of hand injuries. However, he showed a year ago that he still has plenty of hits left in his bat, and more.

Braun pulled his slugging percentage back up to the doorstep of .500, hitting 25 homers and driving in 84 amid a mostly injured and traded away Brewer lineup. He was a presence on the base paths once again as well, swiping 24 bags and scoring 87 runs.

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5. Justin Upton, Tigers (#5 in ’15)

2015: .251/.336/.454 26 HR, 81 RBI, 26 doubles, 85 runs scored, 19 stolen bases, .790 OPS

Last 3 Years: .262/.344/.470 27 HR, 84 RBI, 29 doubles, 85 runs scored, 12 stolen bases, .814 OPS

Despite being saddled with the daunting task of Petco Park for a year, Upton proved that his power was Petco-proof, as he hit 15 of his 26 home runs at home. While never a ‘leading man’ in the sense of driving an offense single-handedly, Upton has been one of the most consistent power sources in the National League since breaking in as a 19 year old with the Diamondbacks. He has hit north of 26 home runs in four of the past five years, and reinserted the speed element back into his game last year as well, swiping 19 bases, his most since 2011.

As he relocates to Detroit this season, he will be hitting in one of the most enviable positions in the game: in front of Miguel Cabrera. An uptick in fastballs should come his way as a result, combined with having Ian Kinsler roaming the bases in front of him, should prove that his decision to bide his time and land with the Tigers could be a very healthy decision for him.

 

4. Starling Marte, Pirates (#3 in ’15)

2015: .287/.337/.444 19 HR, 81 RBI, 30 doubles, 84 runs scored, 30 stolen bases, .780 OPS

Last 3 Years: .286/.345/.446 15 HR, 57 RBI, 28 doubles, 80 runs scored, 34 stolen bases, .790 OPS

Marte’s varied attack upon a game of baseball continued to reach new heights last summer. In addition to his standard issue 30 stolen bases, wide-spanning defensive exploits (for which he netted his first Gold Glove) and .780+ OPS, Marte expanded his pure power and run production numbers as well. He clubbed career-highs in home runs, hits and RBI, while playing a career-best 153 games.

In the Pirates’ relentless offense, Marte has become an indispensable keystone atop the Pirates lineup. However, with the departures of Neil Walker and emergence of Gregory Polanco, Marte will be able to continue his growth as a run producer from the cleanup spot this season. With Polanco, Josh Harrison and Andrew McCutchen among those that will be ahead of him on a daily basis, Marte could stand to see yet another 20+ runs batted in attached to his 2016 total.

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3. Alex Gordon, Royals (#1 in ’15)

2015: .271/.377/.432 13 HR, 48 RBI, 18 doubles, 40 runs scored, 2 stolen bases, .809 OPS

Last 3 Years: .267/.348/.428 17 HR, 68 RBI, 26 doubles, 72 runs scored, 8 stolen bases, .776 OPS

All in all, Gordon, who came in at the number 1 spot on this list a year ago, had a season that mostly lived up to his standard offering last year. He made his third consecutive All-Star Game, was playing the tremendous defensive that has become his calling card and was actually having his best offensive year overall in some time (44 defensive runs saved since 2013). He carries a strong career on-base percentage of .348, and the .377 mark he posted last year would have been a new career high if held over a full season.

However, a nasty groin injury took him out for a month and a half mid-summer, and it took him some time to get back into form. While his defense slid some (he missed out on a fifth consecutive Gold Glove) and his average dipped as well, that was to be expected as he essential rehabbed while still returning to the lineup. Gordon still remains one of the most versatile presences in all of the game, capable of both setting the table and regularly driving in runs as well (87+ runs scored as well as 70+ RBI in each of his past four full seasons). He was worth every penny of the Royals-record contract he inked to remain the face of the franchise and second greatest player in franchise history, and should continue to remain at the All-Star level he has made his custom.

 

2. Michael Brantley, Indians (#2 in ’15)

2015: .310/.379/.480 15 HR, 84 RBI, 45 doubles, 68 runs scored, 15 stolen bases, .859 OPS

Last 3 Years: .308/.366/.462 15 HR, 85 RBI, 39 doubles, 76 runs scored, 18 stolen bases, .828 OPS

Brantley proved that his breakout 2014 season was no fluke, as he continued to hit at an elite level in all of the game last summer. His 45 doubles led the American League, and overall, only Miguel Cabrera and Jose Altuve have hit for a higher average than his .319 since the start of 2014.

Brantley has quietly become one of the best hitters that (cliché time) “nobody talks about”. But over the past two seasons, his effectiveness at the plate has been at an irreproachable level at the position. A patient hitter who gets the most out of his at-bats, Brantley walked nine more times than he struck out last year, while also cutting his K’s while raising his walk total for the third straight year. He also has made the most of his time on base, by also leading the AL in overall doubles and being successful in 38 of his last 40 stolen base attempts. Brantley has 563 total bases over the past two seasons, as he is just a year removed from a 200-hit campaign and a top three finish in the 2014 AL MVP vote.

 

1. Yoenis Cespedes, Mets (#8 in ’15)

2015: .291/.328/.542 35 HR, 105 RBI, 42 doubles, 101 runs scored, 7 stolen bases, .870 OPS

Last 3 Years: .265/.309/.481 28 HR, 95 RBI, 33 doubles, 88 runs scored, 7 stolen bases, .789 OPS

From day one since he broke in with the Oakland A’s, Cespedes has been one of the most freakish athletes in the game, looking better suited to be strong safety in the NFL than a multi-tooled Major League outfielder. But the latter is what he is and few players have the buffet of abilities that Cespedes puts on display on a nightly basis. Whether it be launching the long ball over the fence at a break neck speed, hawking down a ball in the gap or letting loose a laser beam throw to cut down a runner, Cespedes is one of the rare players that can change the game in every aspect possible.

But what he did in he did in his breakout 2015 was a coming of age of sorts for Cespedes turning those tools into an every night impact. After a deadline deal that sent him to the Mets over from the Detroit Tigers, Cespedes produced full-season type numbers in the course of eight weeks. In 57 games, he hammered National League pitching to the tone of a 17 home runs, a .604 slugging % and .942 on-base + slugging percentage. Over course of his time in New York, the Mets’ offensive production increased by three runs per game, the majority reason why they were able to run away with National League East title. MVP’s are not won in two months’ time, but Cespedes certainly made enough people consider it as a rational possibility.

 

Just A Bit Outside: Brett Gardner, Yankees; Khris Davis, Athletics; Melky Cabrera, White Sox.

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Over the past few seasons, left field has been a position that has undergone a lot of overhaul. Former cornerstones of the position such as Ryan Braun, Carlos Gonzalez, Josh Hamilton and Shin-Soo Choo have moved on to other positions, while others who were holding the torch have seen declines in their value. There are also new presences at the position due to further relocations and emergent youngsters as well.

MLB: Kansas City Royals at Arizona Diamondbacks

Overall, it is the most varied position in all of the outfield, where there are elements of bat-first presences, defensively-minded contributors, speed threats and then the blend of a bit of them all. But one thing that is for certain is that each of these players play a major part in the balance of their specific club and the potential of their team’s hangs in the balance of their singular play.

No pressure though, huh?

1. Alex Gordon, Royals (#2 in 2014): His impact on the game is more complete than it really appears at first look. First of all, no outfielder makes a bigger defensive impact on the game. A winner of four consecutive Gold Gloves, Gordon saved 25 runs in left last year, nine more than any other player at his position and saved 37 in full over the past two years. He also has 25 outfield assists as well, which is a right field caliber impact that changes the game with right-handed batters at the plate. Add on the fact that he hit 19 home runs and reached base at a .351% clip, and it seals the fact that he is one of the most uniquely impactful players in the game.

2-year average: .266 average/.765 OPS/20 home runs/78 RBI/30 doubles/11 stolen bases/.995 Fld%

2. Michael Brantley, Indians (Not Ranked): He had the biggest everyday breakout of 2014, as he put together all of the tools he had shown in flashes to become one of the best all-around performers in the game. Brantley finished second in the AL with 200 hits, while finishing in the top five in doubles (45), batting average (.327), on-base percentage (.385) and added in a 20 home runs, 23 stolen bases and 97 RBI for good measure as well. This was all good for a 7.0 WAR figure and a heighted expectation of epic proportions for 2015.

2-year average: .307 average/.813 OPS/15 home runs/85 RBI/36 doubles/20 stolen bases/.993 Fld%

3. Starling Marte, Pirates (#7 in ’14): He shook off a dreadfully slow start to pull together a fantastic all-around year. The 26-year-old outfield hawk (who is playing out of position in left due to who is the centerfielder on his team) set career-high marks at the plate nearly across the board. His .291 average, 144 hits, 56 RBI, 13 home runs and .808 on-base + slugging % were all high water marks. And considering he hit .348 after the All-Star break, those totals are far from fairly representative of the level he could be at this summer.

2-year average: .286 average/.796 OPS/12 home runs/46 RBI/28 doubles/36 stolen bases/.968 Fld%

4. Jayson Werth, Nationals (#10 in right field in ’14): Werth continued his pivotal all-around effort for the Nationals a year ago, topping a .290 average for the third straight year, while driving in 82 runs, scoring another 85 himself and providing some solid pop as well. He will swap spots with Bryce Harper on the corners of the DC outfield for the upcoming year, which will suit each player’s particular skill set even better.

2-year average: .304 average/.887 OPS/20 home runs/82 RBI/30 doubles/10 steals/.986 Fld%

5. Justin Upton, Padres (#5 in ’14): The Padres needed to find someone that could create an offensive spark at the core of their lineup, and Upton fits that bill perfectly. An owner of four seasons of 25 or more home runs and fresh off the heels of a career-best 102 RBI effort, it seems strange that he is still only 27-years-old. But he won his second Silver Slugger in 2014 for his wall banging feats, and is the type of hitter who’s power

2-year average: .267 average/.826 OPS/28 home runs/86 RBI/30 doubles/8 stolen bases/.975 Fld%

6. Hanley Ramirez, Red Sox (#2 at shortstop in ’14): He is one of the toughest players to peg his positional value down to this year, because a) his health is always a factor in his potential impact and b) he has never played outfield before. But all things considered, Hanley remains one of the game’s most impactful talents when he is firing on all cylinders. After resisting permanent change from shortstop for so many years, it became necessary for him to cash in on his total free agent value, which he did with the Red Sox. The Green Monster should vibe well with propensity for line drives, so Hanley could have a huge impact on AL race this year—pending on availability, of course.

2-year average: .308 average/.907 OPS/16 home runs/64 RBI/30 doubles/12 stolen bases/.960 Fld% (SS)

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7. Matt Holliday, Cardinals (#1 in ’14): It was a tale of two halves for Holliday in 2014, who struggled to a very un-Holliday like .263 average during the first three months of the year. He rebounded for a solid finish to the year, and posted some more familiar totals of 20 home runs, 90 RBI and 37 doubles however. While Holliday is showing some signs of decline, he has far from passed his days as an above-average presence in the Cardinal attack.

2-year average: .285 average/.843 OPS/21 home runs/92 RBI/ 34 doubles/5 stolen bases/.983 Fld%

8. Yoenis Cespedes, Tigers (#6 in ’14): He continued to be a source of terrifying power in 2014, winning a second Home Run Derby, while making his All-Star debut. Between Oakland and Boston, Cespedes hit 22 home runs and drove in a career-best 100 runs. He also made a home on highlight reels for some incredible throws from outfield, many of which contributed to the MLB-best 16 outfield assists he totaled as well.

2-year average: .251 average/.744 OPS/24 home runs/90 RBI/28 doubles/7 stolen bases/.978 Fld%

9. Melky Cabrera, White Sox (Not Ranked): He had a statement year in his final one spent north of the border, hitting .300 for the third time in four years. Cabrera also connected for 16 home runs, 73 RBI and 35 doubles, all runner up numbers to previous career bests. He will join the White Sox resurgence this year and be a vital part of a potentially exciting top of the order with Adam Eaton and Jose Abreu.

2-year average: .293 average/.761 OPS/10 home runs/52 RBI/25 doubles/4 stolen bases/.992 Fld%

10. Christian Yelich, Marlins (Not Ranked): The freshly minted 23-year-old began the process of living up to his touted potential in his second season on South Beach. He announced his presence as a fantastic glove wielder, winning the NL left field Gold Glove, working up the most wide-spanning range factor at the position in the league and contributing six outfield assists as well. In addition, he hit .284 and put his speed on display offensively swiping 21 bases while connecting for six triples as the Marlins’ leadoff man.

2-year average: .285 average/.765 OPS/6 home runs/35 RBI/21 doubles/16 stolen bases/.998 Fld%

Runners Up: Corey Dickerson, Brett Gardner, Khris Davis, Evan Gattis

For more on the best of the best in baseball, stay tuned here. For more in the moment words, follow me on Twitter at @CheapSeatFan

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In no other sport do “magic numbers” mean more than in baseball. And while if the validity of such automatic qualifier numbers is still current, or needs to be revised for today’s game is another debate completely, there are still round numbers that prove excellence has been met for a long enough time to take note.

Each new summer brings a chance for a new chance for certain career mile-markers to be met each summer. This summer is no exception, as a few standout marks will be met. On the heels of his recent announcement to retire following the season, Derek Jeter will put the finishing touches on his legacy, which will see him move through the top 10 all-time in hits—and potential reach an awe inspiring cap.

Likewise, Albert Pujols will begin to touch some of the hallowed marks that his effort has long forecasted, as will Miguel Cabrera. More surprisingly however, is what the summer could represent for Adrian Beltre, who is on the cusp of several numbers that will begin to create a completely different connotation for his body of work.

Here are the major career milestones that stand to be met in the 2014 MLB campaign.

HITS

3,500 Hits

3,316—Derek Jeter is 184 hits short of becoming the sixth player ever to reach 3,500 hits. He is 199 hits away from moving ahead of Tris Speaker for fifth place all-time (3,514).

2,500 Hits

2,426—Adrian Beltre will easily surpass the 2,500 level and enters an important year towards making a decisive push towards getting aligned for a shot at 3,000 in his late prime at age 35.

2,000 Hits

1,996—Miguel Cabrera is four hits (or a game and a half for him) away.

1,993—Raul Ibanez is seven hits short of the mark at age 41.

HOME RUNS

500 Home Runs

492—Albert Pujols has hit a home run one per every 14.9 per at-bats in his career, and enters the season eight shy. Not that there was any doubt about his legacy, but this is the first in a line of major posts to be met by the three-time MVP.

450 Home Runs

440—Adam Dunn is ten way, and has hit one per every 14.7 at-bats in his career. It is not certain if he’ll continue after 2014, but he would be safely in range of 500 if he plays through 2015.

438—Paul Konerko is 12 short, and has homered once per every 18.9 at-bats in his career, but will be in a part-time role.

431—David Ortiz is 19 short, and has not had a season with less than 20 in a year since 2001.

400 Home Runs

376—Adrian Beltre, and he has averaged 32 per season over the past four years.

365—Miguel Cabrera is 35 away and has hit not had season total below 44 since 2011.

RUNS BATTED IN

1,500 RBI

1,498—Albert Pujols will meet the mark easily.

1,000 RBI

966—Matt Holliday should meet the mark by the All-Star Break at the latest.

963—Ryan Howard (health abiding) should move past the 1,000 mark. He’s never had a season with fewer than 43 RBI.

500 DOUBLES

495—Adrian Beltre will easily surpass the next milestone in his signature hit in the first month of the year.

200 WINS

189—Bartolo Colon is 11 shy of hitting the 200 mark, due to his late career resurgence in Oakland.

186—Mark Buehrle enters the year 14 victories short of the level. However, if history speaks for the future, he’ll have to wait until next summer—he has won 13 in four of the past five years, and has not topped 13 since 2008.

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2,500 STRIKEOUTS

2,389—CC Sabathia will become the ninth left-hander ever to surpass 2,500 strikeouts this summer, joining Randy Johnson, Steve Carlton, Mickey Lolich, Frank Tanana, Chuck Finley, Tom Glavine, Warren Spahn and Jerry Koosman.

SAVES

350 Saves

341—Joe Nathan enters the year nine saves shy of becoming the ninth player to ever accumulate 350, and has a shot to reach as high as seventh all-time this summer.

300 Saves

286—Jonathan Papelbon stands to shoot up past the middle-tier of closers historically and into near elite standing this year. With his standard 30+ saves he not only passes 300, but to pass into the top 10 next year.

286—Jose Valverde he was signed by the Mets last week to provide bullpen depth, so there’s no clear road to 300, but if he somehow ends up in the role due to an injury to Bobby Parnell he could meet it.

 

For the moments as they inevitably happen in real-time, follow me on Twitter at @CheapSeatFan. For more content, head to I70 Baseball and The Sports Fan Journal.

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When you traditionally think of a leftfielder, the first though is most likely overwhelming power. The names of Bonds, Williams and more recently, Belle jump ahead of the pack, however, the today’s game features a more overall balance of producers at the position, more in the vein of Musial or Ramirez from days past. It is a position with some elite line drive hitters, and run creators that do so not just by hitting the ball over the fence, but by destroying outfield alleys as just as much as giving souvenirs away.

The grouping in left is also undergoing a change as well, with two perennials at the position in Ryan Braun and Carlos Gonzalez manning new positions for the upcoming season. Also, there is a new addition to the Rangers lineup that will impact the rankings as well. Regardless, it is a unique mix of producers, that is so balanced across the board that the same ten players could be picked again next season and for the most part, come across in a completely different order, yet still be justified in their standing.

Here are the top 10 players of the day in the outfield corner on the left corner of the field…

10. Mark Trumbo, Diamondbacks: GM Kevin Towers made it a point to add more non-Goldschmidt based pop to his lineup, and he made a solid choice. Trumbo has hit 29, 32 and 34 home runs his first three seasons, while continually climbing his RBI total each campaign as well.

9. Brett Gardner, Yankees: An elite defender and presence on the basepaths, he led the AL in triples a year ago and has stolen 40 bases in two of his last three full seasons. Another centerfielder playing left, he routinely makes the difficult look easy in the outfield.

8. Josh Hamilton, Angels: He had his worst season last summer, seeing his full-season numbers drop across the board. However, he hit 43 home runs just two years ago and in September of last year, the ice finally cracked, as he finished the year with a .323 average.

7. Starling Marte, Pirates: He’s a centerfielder forced into a left fielder’s role due to his MVP counterpart to the side of him. However, the rangy and athletic 25-year-old ran up 41 stolen bases and 10 triples in his first year as a full-time starter.

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6. Yoenis Cespedes, Athletics: He took the Home Run Derby by storm, rapping moonshot after moonshot out of Citi Field, showing the elite power that he uses to make even the massive o.Co Coliseum look small.

5. Justin Upton, Braves: He shot out of a cannon in 2013 like a ‘bat’ out of hell (literally). And while he slowed down considerably, he still finished with 27 home runs and 70 RBI in his Atlanta debut. The talent package keeps coming in flashes, but few are capable of more than he is.

4. Bryce Harper, Nationals: While he has to continue to reel in his effort some to preserve himself, when he’s is all the way there, few are more exciting than Harper. The 21-year-old already has  42 career homers and has topped 20 doubles, 20 home runs and 10 stolen bases in each of his first two seasons—and at ages when most players are in Single or Double A.

3. Shin-Soo Choo, Rangers: He will play his third outfield spot in as many years in his third home in just as many as well. In his one season visit to the National League, he finished second in on-base percentage, where he reached .423% of the time. He versatile Korean has career averages over the past two seasons of 38 doubles, 18 homers, 20 steals and 98 runs scored.

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2. Alex Gordon, Royals: He is by and far the best defensive left-fielder in the game, winner of the past two Gold Gloves for his field exploits, and sporting a gaudy 34 outfield assists since 2012. He is one year removed from an AL-best 51 doubles season and has topped 20 homers and 80 RBI two of the last three seasons.

1. Matt Holliday, Cardinals: He’s been one of the most consistent hitters in the game over his career, and is the hammer in the Cardinals balanced offering. While his defense is taking some noticeable steps back, he makes up for it has a line drive, run producing regular. 2013 marked the eighth straight year he offered at least a .295 average, 30 plus doubles and 20 plus home runs.

 

Just A Bit Outside: Domonic Brown, Curtis Granderson, Daniel Nava

 

For more on the upcoming season, follow me in real time on Twitter at @CheapSeatFan. For more content, head to The Sports Fan Journal and I-70 Baseball.

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The next entry in the ongoing series looking at the potential candidacy (or lack thereof) for the Baseball Hall of Fame turns to middle of the country and St. Louis Cardinals outfielder Matt Holliday. For the better part of his career, Holliday has been among the most consistent hitters in baseball. From the major boom he made early in his career with the Colorado Rockies, to the role as protector of Albert Pujols, and more recently, lineup axis in St. Louis, Holliday’s comprehensive approach has kept him among his era’s best at the plate.

Yet when assessing his value in the big picture of the game, he’s the classic example of hitter that doesn’t have any eye popping numbers mid-career, but then towards the end has complete body of work that begins to shift the opinion on him some. However, that is a pendulum that can swing both ways: sometimes they continue to build up, yet other times it runs into the ultimate gray area of the “nice, but not quite THAT nice” that so many fantastic hitters have landed at. But Holliday is also playing for consistent contenders and in a solid spotlight as well, which has been known to make the difference in a push over the hump as well.

Let’s have a look at the career of Holliday, where’s it has been and where it could be headed, and if the unique combinations of career levels he’s built already could make him an intriguing candidate somewhere down the line…or not.

The numbers (thru July 12): .310 average, 242 home runs, 919 RBI, 1608 hits, 910 runs, 359 doubles, .385 on-base percentage, .531 slugging percentage

 

The Case For: Holliday has been among the most balanced hitters of the past ten years. In his first decade in the game, he has hit over .300 six times, drove in 100 runs five times and hit over 25 home runs five times as well. Among active players, his .310 career average is the tenth best total, and sixth best among players with ten years served. He is not what would be classified as a power hitter, but he is easily among the best line drive producers of his time, as his seasonal average of 42 doubles indicates. In his 9 full seasons, he has hit over 35 doubles seven times, and led the league with 50 in 2007. Also during that ’07, which truly put him on the map, he led the NL in hits (216), RBI (137), total bases (386) and was the batting champ with a .340 mark. He finished second in the MVP race that season, and was the runner-up in the MVP race.

That season also was his first in the postseason, due to being the catalyst of the Rockies improbable 21 wins in 22 September games and scoring a thrilling (and debated) winning run in the season’s final game against the San Diego Padres to win the NL West on the season’s final day. He has continued his winning ways in St. Louis, where he made the postseason in three of his four seasons, and won a World Series in 2011. Also in St. Louis, he has successful shook off the “Coors Field stigma”, with an average season of .302 avg/25 home runs/95 RBI/165 hits as a Cardinal over roughly four years, compared to a only slightly better .319/25 HR/96 RBI/170 hits per year over five seasons.

The Case Against: For as many benefits as there has been to Holliday’s career, there are a few easy calls against it as well. Even at his very best, he’s been a bit of a complimentary player. He’s been at his best when in an ensemble role: a la not the primary focus. He’s never really carried a team on his own for long; although he’s definitely been a difference maker in all of his stops, save for the brief one in Oakland.

There’s also the Coors factor. His best statistical years were when he was a member of the Rockies, and while he has been an All-Star caliber player elsewhere, perception plays as reality, and the fact that the only time he led his league in anything was in Colorado could hurt him.

Another issue is his age. He’s 33 years old in his tenth year, and while he isn’t showing much downturn, time is not on his side to get in range of many magical numbers that stand out on a HOF resume. His best bet would be stay as close to being a .300 lifetime hitter as he can, because it’s his biggest calling card currently. A steady stream of .300/25/100 seasons would be a strong indicator, because he’ll never be seen as the guiding force in such a deep St. Louis team that sets him from the pack.

There is also the fact that he has struggled in the postseason in his career, hitting only .261 across 10 career postseason series, including a .158 mark in the 2011 World Series. He also had a crucial dropped pop fly that played a pivotal role in the Cardinals’ elimination at the hands of the Dodgers in the 2009 NL Division Series.

Similar Players (thru age 32)

Larry Walker: .312 avg, 262 HR, 855 RBI, 1431 hits, 886 runs, 314 doubles, .389 on-base percentage

Wally Berger: .303 avg, 227 HR, 849 RBI, 1452 hits, 770 runs, 282 doubles, .360 on-base percentage

Magglio Ordonez: .305 avg, 219 HR, 853 RBI, 1436 hits, 744 runs, 289 doubles, .362 on-base %

Holliday had a top two MVP finish, and led the NL in four categories during his breakout 2007 season in Colorado.

Holliday had a top two MVP finish, and led the NL in four categories during his breakout 2007 season in Colorado.

Where he Stands: His resume is a complicated one, because it screams above average for his era, but then it’s much grounded at the same time. Perhaps Holliday is the ultimate “really, really good” player. He’s been an All-Star for more than half of his career, and factored into a few MVP races as well. Yet, at the same time, he’s always been A factor, over being THE factor. He’s been best being able to be the complimentary hammer over the focus of a team’s success. And while there is nothing wrong with that, it is usually a bit tougher on those guys to pull themselves apart from the pack.

Yet what is on his side is winning. He’s consistently been a member of competitive teams due in part to his presence. The Cardinals and Rockies have averaged 86.5 wins per season with Holliday in the fold, who has sported an average of 5.2 Wins Above Replacement over that time. This impact has been particularly evident in the teams he has been a member of who have made the postseason, whom only won their divisions by a half game in 2007 (21 of 22 to finish season), 7 ½ in 2009(he joined at the trade deadline), 1 game in 2011 (won Wild Card on last day of the season) and 2 games (won Wild Card play in) in 2012. All things considered, he has made a steady impact for teams that have had to fight to just make the postseason.

But individually considered there’s more ground to cover. He should top 2,000 hits in about 2.5 years, which would keep him well short of the magic number range. He has another three guaranteed seasons on his deal, which would likely have him in the range of just above 2,100 hits, and if he plays through a few more seasons, about 2,300 hits. In regards to the HOF, that’s borderline and the fact he’ll be below 400 home runs or so for a player of his type is a tough sell as well.

So when the question is asked regarding Matt Holliday, and his likelihood of being IN, OUT or IN-BETWEEN Cooperstown, he’s OUT, but still an upper tier very, very good career…quietly.

 

For more on the now with both Holliday and his St. Louis Cardinals, follow me on Twitter at @CheapSeatFan.

Money is the motive in the winter for Major League Baseball. It’s all that’s discussed and the only thing matters. The price of a player is more important than his actual talent in many cases, and the market is set based on this perceived value. But before any individual figure can be counted, knowing what’s in place already is the key.

To understand where the St. Louis Cardinals are headed, understand where they are already. Below are the full salary figures in place for the club today, as free agency has gotten underway. In 2012, the team’s total payroll was roughly $111,858,500, which stood as the 9th highest in the MLB. This was the highest annual payroll the team has ever paid out, and a $2 million dollar increase from the year before.

The two major subtractions from the 2012 roster are Kyle Lohse ($12.1M) & Lance Berkman ($12M), both of whom will not be back with the team, for financial reasons. While that removes $24 million from the previous year total, there are rising costs that will eat that difference. Yadier Molina’s new $76 million contract will begin to pay out this season, with an increase of $7 million annually. In addition, Adam Wainwright, Chris Carpenter and Rafeal Furcal will see a total increase of $8 million total to their respective deals. Add in raises in arbitration deals, and the Cardinals overall payroll range has changed much, despite taking two big money deals off the board.

Take note of the deals that are also expiring after the 2013 season, which will open up a considerable amount of payroll and roster room. Some most likely would not be renewed (such as Beltran, Furcal and potentially Carpenter), but in the case of Wainwright, there will be a significant rise in a new deal, that could rival the Matt Holliday annual figure.

But that’s all speculative, and below are the facts. Here is a breakdown of the Cardinals’ current payroll on MLB level contracts, and a bit of a read out of what the potential roster both looks like and could manage to add, within reason.

 

Molina’s new contract kicks in this year, making him the second highest paid player on the roster behind Matt Holliday.

Current Non-Arbitration Roster Salaries

Matt Holliday: $17 million (3 years, with $51M remaining + 1 option of $17M for ‘17)

Yadier Molina: $14 million (4 years, with $58 million remaining + 1 option of $15M for ’18)

Carlos Beltran: $13 million (Final season)

Adam Wainwright: $12 million (Final season)

Chris Carpenter: $12.5 million (Final Season)

Jake Westbrook: $8.75 millon (+1 option of $9.5M for ’14)

Rafael Furcal: $7.5 million (Final Season)

Jaime Garcia: $5.75 million (2 years, $17M remaining + 2 options of $11.5 & $12M for ’15 & ’16)

Skip Schumaker: $1.5 millon (Final Season)

COMMITTED 2013 PAYROLL: $92 Million

 

Arbitration Cases (Estimates via MLBTradeRumors.com)

Jason Motte: $4.7 million (Arbitration 2, free agent in 2015)

Edward Mujica: $3.2 million (Arbitration 3, free agent in 2014)

David Freese: $2.6 million (Arbitration 1, free agent in 2016)

Mitchell Boggs: $1.3 million (Arbitration 1, free agent in 2016)

Marc Rzepczynski: $900,000 (Arbitration 1, free agent in 2016)

TOTAL ESTIMATED ARBITRATION PAYROLL: $12.7 Million

 

Motte stands to get a nearly $3 million raise in his second arbitration year after tying for the NL lead in saves.

 

Pre-Arbitration Players (Players on MLB minimum deals)

Jon Jay: $504,000 (under team control until 2017)

Fernando Salas: $498,000 (under team control until 2017)

Allen Craig: $495,000 (under team control until 2017)

Daniel Descalso: $495,000 (under team control until 2017)

Lance Lynn: $482,000 (under team control until 2018)

Tony Cruz: $481,000 (under team control until 2018)

Matt Carpenter: $480,000 (under team control until 2018)

Shane Robinson: $480,000 (under team control until 2018)

TOTAL MINIMUM ALLOTMENTS: $3.91 million

 

Players Due on Minor League Minimums on the 40 man roster is due at $67,300 per year. Only active if promoted to the MLB and subject to promotion to prorated 25 man roster date. Players that would be due this would be players with less than a full year of MLB service time. None of these contract figures are assessed in the team total, due to them not being set on the 2013 roster yet, and still having minor league options. This includes players such as Shelby Miller, Trevor Rosenthal and Adron Chambers.

TOTAL 2013 PAYROLL (Pre-Arbitration Estimate) CURRENTLY: $108.61 million (22 players)

 

 

For more on the daily dealings of the Cardinals, and basically anything of substance I can pull from the cruel baseball-less winter, follow me on Twitter at @CheapSeatFan.

THE ST. LOUIS CARDINALS are headed into one of the biggest series of the season this week, as they host the division-leading Milwaukee Brewers with a three game difference between them. What’s going on with the team and are they in position to make power move in Busch this week? Both teams will bring four game winning streaks into tonight’s game, and something has to give. Here’s what the Cardinals are bringing to the fray

LEADING OFF – Fish Fry: The club did something it hadn’t done since 2004: sweep a four game road trip. For a team that is chasing the hottest team in baseball, this was needed just to keep their head above water. However, the style in which it went down is a lot to get excited about. Albert Pujols and Matt Holliday played like they were swing their actual Silver Slugger Award bats from a year ago while leading an all out assault that ended the week long road trip in a promising fashion.

Holliday and Pujols did the majority of the weekend's work on just a few swings.

The Cards name brand duo was road warriors that Hawk and Animal would’ve been proud of while they pounded their way around South Beach. They hit a combined…

Read up on the rest of Holliday and Pujols attack in the Cards milestone weekend, as well as I look ahead at preparations for another showdown with the Milwaukee Brewers…with first place within grasp once again for the Birds. All today at St. Louis Sports 360: http://stlouissports360.com/cardinals-week-in-preview-vol-4/