The AWARD TOUR – 2013 AL Stan Musial Most Valuable Player

Posted: November 12, 2013 by The Cheap Seat Fan in MLB
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Each award in the Baseball Bloggers Alliance is named after a player that portrays the values best exemplified by the award. Appropriately, the Most Valuable Player in each league receives the Stan Musial Award for their exploits. Musial is easily within the conversation for greatest hitter of all-time; his not a pure power hitter, but still topped 400 home runs. He attacked in volume, topping over 3,600 hits and the second most total bases ever.

The current owner of best hitter in the game has all of these things in common with Musial, as well as a few more. He’s a multiple-time batting champ, that has power to burn, but wastes no at-bats by reaching for the home run only. The best approach to facing Musial, as described by Dodgers pitcher Preacher Roe was to “Throw him four wide and try to pick him off first base”. And judging by the success that AL pitchers have had against Miguel Cabrera over the last few years, this tactic may be one worth dusting off next summer.

2013 American League Stan Musial Most Valuable Player: Miguel Cabrera, Detroit Tigers

Cabrera_Miguel_MVP

The Numbers: .348 avg, 44 HR, 137 RBI, 193 hits, 103 runs, 26 2B, 3 SB, 1.078 OPS, 7.2 WAR

For Miguel Cabrera, 2012 could have easily been the crown jewel of his career. He took home the first Triple Crown in 45 years, won his first MVP and reached another World Series as a capper. However, it was clear by mid-April that last season may have just been a warm up, because Cabrera arguably played better baseball than he ever had before. If not for a superhuman season from Chris Davis aligning with an annoying hip injury, he was running away with adding another Crown to his head.

And while this didn’t finish with a repeat of that rare feat, in 13 less games, Cabrera equaled his home run total from the previous year and came within two RBI and eight hits of his 2012 numbers. He hit an MLB-best .348 (18 points better than 2012) to win his third consecutive batting title. He hit over .360 in three separate months, and .356 in another. Led the AL in on-base and slugging percentage, while striking out only 94 times. He finished in the top two in the MLB in six separate categories.

He’s in the midst of one of the classic runs of excellence at the plate in MLB history, and it actually is tough to blame pitchers for challenging him, because they did it less this time around. He drew 24 more walks in 2013, but he responded by striking out less and making his hits matter more (a career best 1.078 on-base + slugging percentage). All in all, over the last three MLB seasons, his average season has been a .340 average, with 39 home runs, 38 doubles, 127 RBI and a batting title a season. And the way things are going, these ridiculous numbers are a substandard effort for what he’s really doing—and unfortunately for those cunning AL pitchers, there is no sign of any let up soon.

The Rest:

2. Chris Davis-Orioles: .286 avg, 53 HR, 138 RBI, 167 hits, 103 runs, 42 2B, 4 SB, 1.004 OPS, 6.4 WAR

It takes an extraordinary performance to reach the altitudes that Cabrera is living at now, and that is exactly the right word to sum up what Crush did this summer. He led the Majors in home runs, RBI and total bases, and became one of three players to ever hit 50 homers and 40 doubles in the same season.

3. Mike Trout-Angels: .323 avg, 27 HR, 97 RBI, 190 hits, 109 runs, 39 2B, 33 SB, .988 OPS, 9.2 WAR

The most talented player in the game put his buffet of skills on full display again, leading the AL in runs scored and walks, while topping .320 yet again. He set career highs in hits, doubles, RBI and on-base percentage…and continued to reach Wins Above Replacement levels that only that only a player that can do literally everything as well as him can find.

4. Robinson Cano-Yankees: .314 avg, 27 HR, 107 RBI, 190 hits, 81 runs, 41 2B, 7 SB, .899 OPS, 7.6 WAR

The Yankees were far from their usual form this year, but Cano decided not to include himself in that mix, as he put up yet another strong season. He finished in the top five in hits, doubles, average, RBI and played another superb year in the field.

5. Josh Donaldson-Athletics: .301 avg, 24 HR, 93 RBI, 174 hits, 89 runs, 37 2B, 5 SB, .883 OPS, 8.0 WAR

The leader of the Oakland ensemble became Donaldson, who in his first full season in the Majors proved to be a formidable presence in the Oakland lineup. He had 56 multi-hit games on the year and saved his best for last, winning AL Player of the Month honors in September, hitting .337 with 17 extra base hits while helping the A’s to close out another improbable AL West Championship.

6. David Ortiz-Red Sox: .309 avg, 30 HR, 103 RBI, 160 hits, 84 runs, 38 2B, 4 SB, .959 OPS, 4.4 WAR

7. Adrian Beltre-Rangers: .315 avg, 30 HR, 92 RBI, 199 hits, 88 runs, 32 2B, 1 SB, .880 OPS, 5.5 WAR

8. Evan Longoria-Rays: .269 avg, 32 HR, 88 RBI, 165 hits, 91 runs, 39 2B, 1 SB, .842 OPS, 6.3 WAR

9. Dustin Pedroia-Red Sox: .301 avg, 9 HR, 84 RBI, 193 hits, 91 runs, 42 2B, 17 SB, .787 OPS, 6.5 WAR

10. Adam Jones-Orioles: .285 avg, 33 HR, 108 RBI, 186 RBI, 100 runs, 35 2B, 14 SB, .811 OPS, 4.4 WAR

The Awards run is almost complete, but there are is still just a ways to go…and one final big splash with the National League Most Valuable Player to close things out.

November 6: NL/AL Goose Gossage Relief Pitcher of the YearKoji Uehara and Craig Kimbrel

November 7: NL/AL Willie Mays Rookie of the YearWil Myers and Jose Fernandez

November 8: AL Walter Johnson Pitcher of the YearMax Scherzer

November 11: NL Walter Johnson Pitcher of the YearClayton Kershaw

November 12: NL/AL Connie Mack Manager of the Year

November 13: NL Stan Musial Most Valuable Player

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