This is an ongoing study on the one of the most debated topics in all of sports, who’s the greatest baseball player of all time. This is a preview of most study on that subject I’ll be releasing soon. I’m advancing this portion in framing the greatness of the recent retirement of Ken Griffey, Jr and his place in baseball history. Enjoy.

Based on an evaluation of both statistics and achievements across every era of Major League Baseball, I have evaluated the top performers at every position and placed their accomplishments into a scoring rubric to decide who the best is. There have been many different eras of the game and not all accolades have been available for all players to achieve. (Most notably, the All-Star Game didn’t begin until 1933, mid career for some players and completely afterwards for others.) This element and others have been weighted to provide as fair of an evaluation as possible across all eras of baseball. Also, presumptive achievement points have been provided as well to give fair credit to players that would have undoubtedly reach such levels as All-Star, if they were available. (Scoring Rubric is below)

Centerfield

82 years after he played his last game, Cobb's .367 batting average is still tops all time

–         

One of the greatest positions in the history of the game. A variety of types of players, from speedsters to sluggers to some of the greatest overall players in the history of the game. One of the most difficult positions to man overall, it is best served by a diverse talent and that’s what all of these players below are. You will see the genesis of the position throughout the various eras of the game and it is best served shown by the first man on the list….

1.       Willie Mays: New York/San Francisco Giants (1951-1973): 93.5 points–          .302 Avg. 660 HRs, 1903 RBI, .384 OBP, 3283 Hits, 2062 Runs, 338 Stolen Bases

–          12 Gold Gloves, 1 World Series, 2 MVPs, 1 ROY, 1 Batting Title, 0 Triple Crowns, 4 HR Titles, 24 All-Star Games

2.       Ty Cobb: Detroit Tigers (1905-1928): 90 points

–          .367 Avg. 117 HRs, 1938 RBI, .424 OBP, 4191 Hits, 2245 Runs, 892 Stolen Bases 

–          0 Gold Gloves, 0 World Series, 1 MVP, 0 ROY, 12 Batting Titles, 1 Triple Crown, 2 HR Titles, 0 All-Star Games (Presumptive 14 awarded) 

3.       Mickey Mantle: New York Yankees (1951-1968): 74 points

–          .298 Avg. 536 HRs, 1509 RBI, .421 OBP, 2415 Hits, 1677 Runs, 153 Stolen Bases

–          1 Gold Glove, 7 World Series, 3 MVPs, 0 ROY, 1 Batting Title, 1 Triple Crown, 4 HR Titles, 16 All-Star Games

4.       Ken Griffey, Jr: Seattle Mariners (1989-2010): 64.5 points

–          .284 Avg. 630 HRs, 1779 RBI, .370 OBP, 2781 Hits, 1662 Runs, 184 Stolen Bases

–          10 Gold Gloves, 0 World Series, 1 MVP, 0 ROY, 0 Batting Titles, 0 Triple Crown, 4 HR Titles, 13 All-Star Games

5.       Tris Speaker: Cleveland Indians/Boston Red Sox (1907-1928): 60.5 points

–          .345 Avg. 117 HRs, 1529 RBI, .428 OBP, 3514 Hits, 1882 Runs, 432 Stolen Bases

–          0 Gold Gloves, 3 World Series, 0 MVP, 0 ROY, 1 Batting Title, 0 Triple Crown, 1 HR Title, 0 All-Star Games (Presumptive 13 awarded)

6.       Joe DiMaggio: New York Yankees (1936-1951): 57.5 points

–          .325 Avg. 361 HRs, 1537 RBI, .398 OBP, 2214 Hits, 1390 Runs, 30 Stolen Bases

–          0 Gold Gloves, 9 World Series, 3 MVPs, 0 ROY, 2 Batting Titles, 0 Triple Crowns, 2 HR Titles, 10 All-Star Games

Playing with Cobb kept him from more batting titles, Speaker still has the most doubles of all-time (792).

7.       Billy Hamilton: Philadelphia Phillies (1888-1901): 51 points

–          .344 Avg. 40 HRs, 736 RBI, .455 OBP, 2158 Hits, 1690 Runs, 912 Stolen Bases

–          0 Gold Gloves, 2 World Series, 0 MVPs, 0 ROY, 2 Batting Titles, 0 Triple Crowns, 0 HR Titles, 0 All-Star Games (Presumptive 8 awarded)

8.       Kirby Puckett: Minnesota Twins (1984-1995): 40 points

–          .318 Avg. 207 HRs, 1085 RBI, .360 OBP, 2304 Hits, 1071 Runs, 134 Stolen Bases

–          6 Gold Gloves, 2 World Series, 0 MVP, 0 ROY, 1 Batting Title, 0 Triple Crown, 0 HR Titles, 10 All-Star Games

9.       Edd Roush: Cincinnati Reds (1913-1931): 39.5 points

–          .323 Avg. 68 HR, 981 RBI, .369 OBP, 2376 Hits, 1099 Runs, 268 Stolen Bases

–          0 Gold Gloves, 1 World Series, 0 MVPs, 0 ROY, 2 Batting Titles, 0 Triple Crowns, 0 HR Titles, 0 All-Star Games (Presumptive 11 awarded)

10.   Duke Snider: Brooklyn Dodgers (1947-1964): 39 points

–          .295 Avg. 407 HR, 1333 RBI, .380 OBP, 2116 Hits, 1259 Runs, 99 Stolen Bases

–          0 Gold Gloves, 2 World Series, 0 MVPs, 0 ROY, 0 Batting Titles, 0 Triple Crowns, 1 HR Title, 8 All-Star Games

– Close runners up: Jim Edmonds, Larry Doby, Lloyd Waner

Batters Study Rubric

Batting Average– .350 & above (10 pts), .349 to .330 (9 pts), .329 to .320 (8pts), .319 to .310 (7 pts), .309 to .300 (6 pts), .299 to 290 (5 pts), .289 to .280 (4pts), .279 to 270 (3 pts), .269 & below (2 pts)

Home Runs– 600 & above (10 pts), 599 to 550 (9 pts), 549 to 500 (8 pts), 499 to 450 (7 pts), 449 to 400 (6 pts), 399 to 350 (5 pts), 349 to 300 (4 pts), 299 to 250 (3 pts), 249 & below (2 pts)

Runs Batted In– 1900 & above (10 pts), 1899 to 1800 (9 pts), 1799 to 1700 (8 pts), 1699 to 1600 (7 pts), 1599 to 1500 (6 pts), 1499 to 1350 (5 pts), 1349 to 1200 (4 pts), 1199 to 1050 (3 pts), 1040 & below (2 pts)

On Base Percentage– .470 & above (10 pts), .469 to .450 (9 pts), .449 to .430 (8 pts), .429 to .410 (7 pts), .409 to .390 (6 pts), .389 to .370 (5 pts), .369 to .340 (4 pts), .339 to .320 (3 pts), .319 & below (2 pts)

Hits– 4000 & above (10 pts), 3999 to 3600 (9 pts), 3599 to 3300 (8 pts), 3299 to 3000 (7 pts), 2999 to 2700 (6 pts), 2699 to 2400 (5 pts), 2399 to 2100 (4 pts), 2099 to 2070 (3 pts), 2069 & below (2 pts)

Runs– 2100 & above (10 pts), 2099 to 2000 (9 pts), 1999 to 1900 (8 pts), 1899 to 1800 (7 pts), 1799 to 1700 (6 pts), 1699 to 1600 (5 pts), 1599 to 1500 (4 pts), 1499 to 1400 (3 pts), 1399 & below (2 pts)

Stolen Bases– 1,000 & above (10 pts), 999 to 850 (9 pts), 849 to 700 (8 pts), 699 to 550 (7 pts), 549 to 450 (6 pts), 449 to 300 (5 pts), 299 to 150 (4 pts), 149 to 50 (3 pts), 49 & below (2 pts)

Accolades

Gold Glove Awards: .5 points

World Series Championships: .5

Most Valuable Player Awards: 1 point

Rookie of the Year Awards: 1 point

Batting Titles: 1 point

Triple Crowns: 3 points

Home Run Champion: 1 point

*All-Star Appearances: 1 point

*Presumptive All-Star points are given to a player whose careers either proceeded or largely was played before the All-Star Game began in 1933. Formulated as 60% x the total number of years played.

King of Kings in many opinions, there was nothing Mays couldn't do better than most

Advertisements
Comments
  1. […] offense that made us look. He was an athlete who revolutionized an athletic position, is one of the best center fielders of all time (thanks Matthew Whitener of Cheap.Seats.Please) and will be a first ballot Hall of Famer. Junior […]

  2. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Matt Whitener, Michael Tillery. Michael Tillery said: Check out this detailed look into the greatest center fielders of all time written by @cheapseatfan http://tinyurl.com/2fsbtel […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s